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artistiology:

One of my favorite performances.

Belle & Sebastian- The Stars of Track and Field

You only did it so that you could wear
Your terry underwear
And feel the city air
Run past your body

(via wetcasements)

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God, how do you keep from killing yourself?

God, how do you keep from killing yourself?

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"Eric Ervine, Jimmy Hasse, and Heidi Unkefer make up the entire art department of The Onion, producing about 50 original images per week for theonion.com (Nicole Antonuccio handles the art for Clickhole). “Calling them artistic wizards is a disservice to their talents,” managing editor Berkley says. “Really, it’s a travesty that Adobe hasn’t renamed Photoshop after them"…

"What The Onion does is more difficult than it seems; just look at less successful copycats, like the Daily Currant, to see what a high-wire act satirical journalism is. But The Onion is doing more than just writing fake news; with just a handful of writers and a three-person art department, it has managed to create what television and movies often fail to do: a fully-functioning, fascinating world just different enough from our own to serve as a damning critique of it."

— from “The Look Of Funny: How The Onion’s Art Department Works,” Co.Design. About time these guys got some credit.

"Eric Ervine, Jimmy Hasse, and Heidi Unkefer make up the entire art department of The Onion, producing about 50 original images per week for theonion.com (Nicole Antonuccio handles the art for Clickhole). “Calling them artistic wizards is a disservice to their talents,” managing editor Berkley says. “Really, it’s a travesty that Adobe hasn’t renamed Photoshop after them"…

"What The Onion does is more difficult than it seems; just look at less successful copycats, like the Daily Currant, to see what a high-wire act satirical journalism is. But The Onion is doing more than just writing fake news; with just a handful of writers and a three-person art department, it has managed to create what television and movies often fail to do: a fully-functioning, fascinating world just different enough from our own to serve as a damning critique of it."

— from “The Look Of Funny: How The Onion’s Art Department Works,” Co.Design. About time these guys got some credit.

Photoset

1940s pin-up photos of Dinah Shore, Doris Day, and Eartha Kitt. These and more at the inexplicably undervalued Music Weird.

Photoset

craigfernandez:

Love & Rockets

Every one a winner.

(via dirtyriver)

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The Limeliters, 1963. Square but stylish.

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Reflecting upon several decades of company logos, I have decided that this one, for the moving company Yamato, is my all-time favorite. It has everything: Moment of mystification, followed by pleasing shock of recognition; implication of a high level of service and literally loving care (as if it were their own!); and, finally, cats.

Reflecting upon several decades of company logos, I have decided that this one, for the moving company Yamato, is my all-time favorite. It has everything: Moment of mystification, followed by pleasing shock of recognition; implication of a high level of service and literally loving care (as if it were their own!); and, finally, cats.

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eudaemaniacal:

ALL HAIL MACBETH HAIL TO THEE THANE OF GLAMIS
ALL HAIL MACBETH HAIL TO THEE THANE OF CAWDOR
ALL HAIL MACBETH THOU SHALT BE KING HEREAFTER

eudaemaniacal:

ALL HAIL MACBETH HAIL TO THEE THANE OF GLAMIS

ALL HAIL MACBETH HAIL TO THEE THANE OF CAWDOR

ALL HAIL MACBETH THOU SHALT BE KING HEREAFTER

(Source: thepowergame, via see-reverse-side)

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Our little corner of Northeast DC is modest, down-home, even a little countrified; but the local land rush has reached us. Over the past year and a half we’ve seen dozens of houses gutted, rehabbed, sometimes built onto (including those ugly extra floors on rowhouses called “middle fingers” in the trade). There’s an eerie influx of young white people, and they don’t seem to be renters; I attended a neighborhood clean-up event some months back and was surrounded by twentysomethings talking about their land values and renovations.

The prices are going up too. Last year a house up in Trinidad, an area long known to realtors as “Trinibad,” went for $900,000. 

But this being, as I said, a modest place, there are still plenty of people here who have no intention of moving — or, if the idea is put into their heads by financial disaster or ambitious relatives, have no idea how to exploit the land rush. Their dealings and those of their friends with the big-money world are rare and usually unpleasant.

That’s what signs like this one are about. They appeal to people who aren’t accustomed to brokers or real estate negotiations. In exchange for a crappy deal on which they will profit handsomely, the house-buyers offer speed and a minimum of fuss, like a pawn shop for property. It’ll be over quick and then you can put something in the bank when you move in with your kids, or to an assisted living facility.

The thing about capitalism that its boosters don’t get is, not everyone is Warren Buffett. No, I take that back — they get it alright.

Our little corner of Northeast DC is modest, down-home, even a little countrified; but the local land rush has reached us. Over the past year and a half we’ve seen dozens of houses gutted, rehabbed, sometimes built onto (including those ugly extra floors on rowhouses called “middle fingers” in the trade). There’s an eerie influx of young white people, and they don’t seem to be renters; I attended a neighborhood clean-up event some months back and was surrounded by twentysomethings talking about their land values and renovations.

The prices are going up too. Last year a house up in Trinidad, an area long known to realtors as “Trinibad,” went for $900,000.

But this being, as I said, a modest place, there are still plenty of people here who have no intention of moving — or, if the idea is put into their heads by financial disaster or ambitious relatives, have no idea how to exploit the land rush. Their dealings and those of their friends with the big-money world are rare and usually unpleasant.

That’s what signs like this one are about. They appeal to people who aren’t accustomed to brokers or real estate negotiations. In exchange for a crappy deal on which they will profit handsomely, the house-buyers offer speed and a minimum of fuss, like a pawn shop for property. It’ll be over quick and then you can put something in the bank when you move in with your kids, or to an assisted living facility.

The thing about capitalism that its boosters don’t get is, not everyone is Warren Buffett. No, I take that back — they get it alright.

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Fuck everything; shut up and drink.